Like Comcast, Google Fiber is including class action waivers in its customer agreements

June 22, 2016 by

fine printGoogle Fiber has added new terms to its customer agreements.  Like other large Internet service providers, customers who want to sue Google Fiber must now instead submit to arbitration.

The Google Fiber terms were updated last week with a note that they now “require the use of binding arbitration to resolve disputes rather than jury trials or class actions.”

While the clause allows cases in small claims court, it otherwise forces customers to waive the right to bring legal actions against the internet service provider.  Arbitration must be sought on an individual basis, as the clause also prevents class arbitration.

Previously, the terms of service did not have the binding arbitration clause, though they did limit Google Fiber’s liability to the amount customers pay to use the services.  An e-mail sent to customers on June 14 says the new terms of service will apply unless they call to cancel service within 30 days. If customers do nothing, they will have “accepted” the terms at that 30-day mark. After that, customers who remain with Google Fiber have another 30 days to opt out of the new terms using the online form.

Steve Larson
An experienced trial lawyer who handles both hourly and contingent fee cases, Steve has expertise in class actions, consumer cases, antitrust litigation, securities litigation, corporate disputes, intellectual property disputes, unfair competition claims, employment matters, and disputes involving family wealth. Steve regularly represents individuals and businesses in federal and state court and has obtained class-wide recovery in multiple class actions. A veteran practitioner, Steve's clients value his creative approach to resolving complex litigation matters.

Legal Disclaimer

The information contained in this blog does not constitute legal advice, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. We make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to this blog.