Match.com subscribers file class action alleging use of bogus profiles

January 18, 2011 by

Subscribers of U.S. online dating giant Match.com allege in a class action complaint filed in the US District Court in Dallas that Match.com uses bogus romantic come-ons by phony or inactive members to get subscribers to renew, a lawsuit alleges.  The suit alleges that more than half the personal profiles featured on Match.com belong to inactive members or scammers.

This — plus the charge the company doesn’t vet profiles for legitimacy or delete profiles of canceled customers — is a breach of contract, a breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and negligent misrepresentation, the five men and women suing the Dallas company allege.  The plaintiffs, who seek unspecified damages and repayment of their subscription fees, also seek class-action status for their lawsuit, which would let a large group of people collectively to bring claims to court.

Match.com, which was founded in 1995 and says it has more than 1.82 million paid subscribers, said in a statement quoted by The Dallas Morning News that the lawsuit had “no merit.”  The company said it would “defend the lawsuit vigorously.”

Match.com earned $38.1 million in the most recent period, parent IAC/InterActiveCorp. said in an earnings report.

Steve Larson
An experienced trial lawyer who handles both hourly and contingent fee cases, Steve has expertise in class actions, consumer cases, antitrust litigation, securities litigation, corporate disputes, intellectual property disputes, unfair competition claims, employment matters, and disputes involving family wealth. Steve regularly represents individuals and businesses in federal and state court and has obtained class-wide recovery in multiple class actions. A veteran practitioner, Steve's clients value his creative approach to resolving complex litigation matters.

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