Class Actions Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’

Article in The Hill explains why the new CFPB banning mandatory arbitration is a good thing

Posted on: July 13th, 2017 by Steve Larson

Paul Bland has written an excellent article in The Hill that reviews the background behind the publication of the new CFPB rule banning mandatory arbitration, and addresses the merits and criticisms of the new rule.

Here is the link.  http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/finance/341472-who-will-gop-lawmakers-stand-with-the-people-or-crooked-bankers.

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CFPB issues rule banning mandatory arbitration agreements in consumer finance documents

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 by Steve Larson

On July 10, 2017, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced a new rule to ban companies from using mandatory arbitration clauses to deny groups of people their day in court. Many consumer financial products like credit cards and bank accounts have arbitration clauses in their contracts that prevent consumers from joining together to sue their bank or financial company for wrongdoing. By forcing consumers to give up or go it alone – usually over small amounts – companies can sidestep the court system, avoid big refunds, and continue harmful practices. The CFPB’s new rule will deter wrongdoing by restoring consumers’ right to join together to pursue justice and relief through group lawsuits.

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This blog is intended to provide information to the general public and to practitioners about developments that may impact Oregon class actions.

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  • Steve Larson

  • Steve Larson
  • Steve Larson has been representing investors, consumers and employees in class actions in Oregon for over 20 years. He is a shareholder at the law firm of Stoll Berne in Portland, Oregon.
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